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Everything You Need to Know When Filming Food Videos

Logan Baker

From setting up your camera to picking the right music, this roundup shows you everything you need to know to produce your cooking videos.

Top image via Cinecom.net.

Top-down cooking videos are one of the most popular genres of content for YouTube and Vimeo. Whether you’re making the content for YouTube, Instagram, or your own personal website, you can put together and shoot each kind of video in different ways. There’s no formula. This roundup will show you a few different techniques to put it all together with the right equipment. Here are few ways you can approach a cooking video.


Creating a Cooking Video From the Ground Up

All you need for this type of shot is a C-stand for your camera. Now, this isn’t the only way you can pull off this shot. If you’re using a bigger bodied camera, you can use two C-stands and have them meet in the center for your camera. Or, you could build one of these…


Building a Cheap Overhead Rig

So as you can see, all you need are a couple pieces of wood, some screws, and a drill. The dimensions for this specific type of rig will vary based on your studio or garage setup. Unlike the C-stand (which is meant for moving around from shoot to shoot), this rig is stationary. This way you can come back and have your setup always ready to go.

Also, the sides of this build can also hold poster board or any type of backdrop, making it easy for food or product photography. This is perfect for after you’ve made your meal on camera. You can get some nice slo-mo steaming shots of the final product without transporting the food or prepping a new lighting setup.


How to Make Stop-Motion Food Videos

So this style is a little old-school and non-traditional for the cooking genre. But, this type of video is entertaining and a good way to attract views to your channel. The setup is simple. Just make sure you have an evenly lit, solid-colored backdrop and a camera that you can operate remotely. Remote operation will save you from accidentally changing the camera’s position, and you can freely begin to animate your food.

As you can see in the video, this style of fun, light-hearted content pairs well with Rocketstock’s new video pack, “Yum.”

The pack features over 120 food animations, logo reveals, lower thirds, and icons for anybody just starting their own company or YouTube channel. The assets are simple to use and don’t require a hefty knowledge of After Effects. You can download the new pack here.

So what else do you need for your next cooking series?

Music. Music can be one of the most crucial parts to making a good video for YouTube. We’ve curated a playlist for cooking videos to match the calm, breezy feeling that these videos bring to the table. Check out the playlist here.

What other type of playlists and instructional videos would you like to see in the future? Share the wealth in the comments.